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Zinc

After iron, zinc is the second most common essential trace element in the body; it is vital and cannot be produced by the human body itself. In addition, the body can hardly store zinc, which is why it must be taken in regularly with food. Zinc is found, for example, in meat, especially liver, in fish and seafood, in high amounts in oysters, in certain types of cheese (e.g. Emmental), in oatmeal, in pulses, e.g. soybeans, and in certain seeds and kernels. When calcium, iron, copper and tannins (tannins) are ingested at the same time in higher doses, zinc absorption (uptake) can be inhibited. Phytic acid, which is contained in cereals and legumes, forms insoluble zinc-calcium-phytate complexes with zinc and thus reduces the absorption of zinc from food. Mustard oil glycosides (or glucosinolates) in plants such as radish, mustard, cress and cabbage, also lead to complex formation with zinc in high concentrations. In principle, zinc from animal foods is therefore more bioavailable than from plant foods, since animal foods do not contain any absorption-inhibiting substances such as phytic acid, mustard oil glycosides or tannins. However, it is also known that phytic acid is broken down during germination (even when soaked in water for a longer period, e.g. overnight) of cereals, legumes or oilseeds and in this way the bioavailability of minerals and spuAfter iron, zinc is the second most common essential trace element in the body; it is vital and cannot be produced by the human body itself. In addition, the body can hardly store zinc, which is why it must be taken in regularly with food. Zinc is found, for example, in meat, especially liver, in fish and seafood, in high amounts in oysters, in certain types of cheese (e.g. Emmental), in oatmeal, in pulses, e.g. soybeans, and in certain seeds and kernels. When calcium, iron, copper and tannins (tannins) are ingested at the same time in higher doses, zinc absorption (uptake) can be inhibited. Phytic acid, which is contained in cereals and legumes, forms insoluble zinc-calcium-phytate complexes with zinc and thus reduces the absorption of zinc from food. Mustard oil glycosides (or glucosinolates) in plants such as radish, mustard, cress and cabbage, also lead to complex formation with zinc in high concentrations. In principle, zinc from animal foods is therefore more bioavailable than from plant foods, since animal foods do not contain any absorption-inhibiting substances such as phytic acid, mustard oil glycosides or tannins. However, it is also known that phytic acid is broken down during germination (even when soaked in water for a longer period, e.g. overnight) of cereals, legumes or oilseeds and in this way the bioavailability of minerals and trace elements, including zinc, is increased. Zinc absorption is also promoted by foods containing vitamin C.